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Why it’s important to ask about your baby’s heart during an ultrasound

Why it’s important to ask about your baby’s heart during an ultrasound

by Jenny Fernandez, Boston Children’s Hospital –

Did you know that at least half of all babies born with a heart condition are not diagnosed during pregnancy? Heart defects can seriously impact a child’s health, but knowing ahead of time will allow you to find the right people who can help.

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Seasonal, Heart-Healthy Holiday Foods

Deck the halls, but don’t ditch your diet! Stay heart-healthy with seasonal, healthy foods.

For many, the holidays are the most wonderful — and least heart-healthy — time of the year.
Grandma’s fudge is a sentimental favorite, and the neighbor’s cake balls are a decadent habit. Indulging a little won’t hurt — but planning ahead will make for merry meals that are healthy too.

aha-open-your-heart-committee

Dr. Klein on the AHA Open Your Heart Committee

Dr. Lisa Klein is a proud participant in the local American Heart Association Chapter on the Open Your Heart Committee of Go Red for Women.

The Open Your Heart Campaign funds research, education and advocacy efforts for the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement.  Heart disease and stroke take 1 in 3 women’s lives.  
Energy Drinks

Cardiac complications from energy drinks? Case report adds new evidence

The high levels of caffeine in energy drinks may lead to cardiac complications, suggests a case report in the July/August Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

The case adds to previous reports of adverse cardiovascular events related to consuming energy drinks,

Hall Family

Gretchen’s story: A blue baby and living legend

“I was very lucky to be born when I was,” says Gretchen Hall, talking about her congenital heart disease.

Born a “blue baby” in 1960, Gretchen’s parents were told that her chances of living very long were low. Her parents prayed she would be with them for a year.

Gretchen was born with cyanotic heart disease,

Credit: http://www.wndu.com/content/news/Wearable-technology-tracks-heart-health-387674221.html

Wearable technology tracks heart health

By Maureen McFadden |

Posted: Wed 6:13 PM, Jul 20, 2016  |

This is not your father’s heart-rate monitor. Wearable, stretchable electronics can now monitor several body functions and instantaneously send the information to a doctor. Here are more details on how the implications could be huge for patients in sickness and in health.

Closeup view of scales on a floor and kids feet

Complications of obesity in children and adolescents

It should come as no surprise that obesity can bring a multitude of short and long-term health complications for adults. Unfortunately, this epidemic doesn’t stop there. Obesity in children and adolescents is a growing concern, as experts continue to study the role that obesity plays in jeopardizing the overall health and lifespan of today’s children.

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Summer Eats: Top 5 Healthy Foods for Your Heart

Summer is a great time to renew your resolution to eat more healthy foods. Combined in healthy menus, summertime foods can help give you more than just one season of heart health.

Dietitians Julia Zumpano, RD, LD and  Kate Patton, MEd, RD, CSSD, LD, both of Cleveland Clinic’s Section of Preventive Cardiology &

Woman on Treadmill

How to Keep Your Heart Healthy After Surgery

The irregular heartbeat of atrial fibrillation is a possible complication after surgery.

If you’re about to have surgery, anxiety could momentarily give you butterflies and make you feel as though your heart is racing.
Mother Breastfeeding Baby

Breast-feeding improves later-life heart health for preterm infants

Breast-feeding is known to offer a wealth of health benefits for babies, and a new study has just uncovered another: better long-term heart structure and function for preterm infants.

Breast-feeding may benefit the later-life heart health of preterm infants, say researchers.

These findings will be welcome news for parents of the 1 in 10 infants who are born prematurely in the United States each year,